Counsellor

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2ndtime Posts: 43
Not sure if this is the right board but sure here goes! Could anyone recomend a counsellor in Central or North Dublin who doesn't cost a bomb?. Thanks in advance
katief Posts: 1900
A lot of people think that any counsellor will do. It really depends on the nature of the problem. A bereavement Counsellor does what it says on the tin and are fine if you need to unleash tears and anger or for someone to listen to you. Other problems require a much higher level of help. With problems such as depression, or deeper problems such as psychosis and personality disorders, you need someone with at least a Masters degree in Counselling Psychology with the adequate training. Also, sliding scale Counsellors for the latter problems generally aren't the best people to go to. Have you looked into the HSE? You can get referred through the outpatients department through the Consultant Psychiatrist.
whoop whoop Posts: 1616
[quote="katief":3a5qe8o4]A lot of people think that any counsellor will do. It really depends on the nature of the problem. A bereavement Counsellor does what it says on the tin and are fine if you need to unleash tears and anger or for someone to listen to you. Other problems require a much higher level of help. With problems such as depression, or deeper problems such as psychosis and personality disorders, you need someone with at least a Masters degree in Counselling Psychology with the adequate training. Also, sliding scale Counsellors for the latter problems generally aren't the best people to go to. Have you looked into the HSE? You can get referred through the outpatients department through the Consultant Psychiatrist.[/quote:3a5qe8o4] I'd disagree with a lot of that (not saying it's wrong, just want to offer another opinion). I don't believe you need to find a specialist counsellor for specific issues (i.e. any well-trained and experienced counsellor can deal with bereavement, depression, anxiety etc.). If you have a significant or chronic issue you probably should see a psychologist, but if you just need someone to talk things through with, there are a lot of really good counsellors out there who aren't psychologists but are well trained, often to postgraduate level (but it's an unregulated profession so look up the IACP for accredited professionals) Your GP can refer you to a counsellor, but you don't necessarily need to see a psychiatrist. Some private counsellors offer a sliding scale. Some counselling services offer a lower rate for the unemployed or if you are willing to see a trainee (who will be heavily supervised by an experienced qualified counsellor).
Girl From Mars Posts: 1446
What kind of budget are you on 2nd Time? I know one in Swords, he's €50 per session (a session is an hour)
katief Posts: 1900
A sliding scale Counsellor does not have the experience to deal with deeper mental health issues. And just to let you know, "supervision" doesnt mean the client will be able to keep seeing a trainee just because theyre getting supervised. Often clients will not be able to be helped with problems that require much higher level of care. But yes, as I said in my first post, it depends on the nature of the problem. Bereavememt, reactive depression can be beneficial from a counsellor. Be careful of those who advertise "DBT". One individual CANNOT conduct DBT alone. DBT is run on a programme with a rotating team of psychologists. Also, an "honours degree" is not enough. For deeper problems, a counselling psychologist is what you need and this would be best through a doctor's referral. Also Whoop whoop, a doctor may recommend a counsellor alright (in which you pay privately), but when they refer you, you go through the Registrar/consultant psychiatrist first, in which youre assessed and then (depending on the diagnosis) referred onto their team of psychologists. Hence, the HSE. It can be done through private health insurance too. It really does depend on what the problem is.
FutureWife Posts: 298
Different perspectives here I would feel that you are better off seeking someone who works in that area , particularly if your therapist is less rather than more qualified if you know what I mean . I guess I'm thinking of counselling available through voluntary agencies or church or charitable organisations , they can be very good and have had alot of experience and even training but probably more in the area their agency deals with . Just to maximise your chance of hitting on the right person for you . Unfortunately it is the case that if you want formal counselling through the public health service this may involve referal through mental health services - its just how things are organised . On the private front there is lots available but its so hard to choose when the qualifications vary ( as someone has said ) . I'm not sure what the area you're thinking of but would you try one of the voluntary agencies , SVDP have great experience with money issues , barnados are good with family or children problems .If there was a cost involved it might be a bit more manageable. I can't think of who works in bereavement but maybe other people could suggest organisations that work in different areas ?
whoop whoop Posts: 1616
[quote="katief":3ouund4x]A sliding scale Counsellor does not have the experience to deal with deeper mental health issues. And just to let you know, "supervision" doesnt mean the client will be able to keep seeing a trainee just because theyre getting supervised. [/quote:3ouund4x] I don't know what either of those sentences mean? A 'sliding scale counsellor' is just a counsellor who offers a sliding scale for those who are unemployed or in financial difficulty. It has zero to do with their experience or qualifications?? Also I don't know what you mean about supervision. All I meant is that while some people are reticent about seeing someone who is still in training, it can be helpful to know that there is a fully qualified and very experienced supervisor 'behind the scenes' supporting the trainee to help you as best they can. And a lot of GP's will refer directly to a counsellor without having to go to a psychiatrist first. Not all though, you may end up being referred to a community mental health team. Which could be a great thing, depending on how serious the problem is. Might be a bit of a wait though.
katief Posts: 1900
[quote="whoop whoop":9syts4sl][quote="katief":9syts4sl]A sliding scale Counsellor does not have the experience to deal with deeper mental health issues. And just to let you know, "supervision" doesnt mean the client will be able to keep seeing a trainee just because theyre getting supervised. [/quote:9syts4sl] I don't know what either of those sentences mean? A 'sliding scale counsellor' is just a counsellor who offers a sliding scale for those who are unemployed or in financial difficulty. It has zero to do with their experience or qualifications?? Also I don't know what you mean about supervision. All I meant is that while some people are reticent about seeing someone who is still in training, it can be helpful to know that there is a fully qualified and very experienced supervisor 'behind the scenes' supporting the trainee to help you as best they can. And a lot of GP's will refer directly to a counsellor without having to go to a psychiatrist first. Not all though, you may end up being referred to a community mental health team. Which could be a great thing, depending on how serious the problem is. Might be a bit of a wait though.[/quote:9syts4sl] Without sounding smart, it means what I've just said. Sliding scale therapy clinics or companies usually offer low-cost counselling with their staff who are in training or at least in their final year of studies. If there are lower rates for the unemployed etc conducted by the fully qualified therapist, then it's usually only €20 knocked off. You also don't get referred to a private counsellor from a GP. The community mental health team yes are good, but generally they have a stringent catchment area. Cluain mhuire for example, you have to live within the area to gain access. Other catchment areas such as Tallaght, you have to see the consultant psychiatrist first and it's taken from there.
Flower Girl Posts: 1645
[quote="katief":3oozi6wv] Sliding scale therapy clinics or companies usually offer low-cost counselling with their staff who are in training or at least in their final year of studies. If there are lower rates for the unemployed etc conducted by the fully qualified therapist, then it's usually only €20 knocked off. You also don't get referred to a private counsellor from a GP. [/quote:3oozi6wv] Lots of private counsellors work on a sliding scale, it has nothing whatsoever to do with their experience or qualifications. Some of them may indeed be trainees, but lots aren't. I used to do temp work in the Rape Crisis Centre, and many of the highly-experienced counsellors there worked on a sliding scale. And you can indeed get referred to a private counsellor by a GP, they do it all the time and would probably be your best source for information on what type of counsellor you need; however, you don't [i:3oozi6wv]have[/i:3oozi6wv] to have a GP referral, and most counsellors will accept self-referrals from clients.
katief Posts: 1900
[quote="Flower Girl":f8dfmqrf][quote="katief":f8dfmqrf] Sliding scale therapy clinics or companies usually offer low-cost counselling with their staff who are in training or at least in their final year of studies. If there are lower rates for the unemployed etc conducted by the fully qualified therapist, then it's usually only €20 knocked off. You also don't get referred to a private counsellor from a GP. [/quote:f8dfmqrf] Lots of private counsellors work on a sliding scale, it has nothing whatsoever to do with their experience or qualifications. Some of them may indeed be trainees, but lots aren't. I used to do temp work in the Rape Crisis Centre, and many of the highly-experienced counsellors there worked on a sliding scale. And you can indeed get referred to a private counsellor by a GP, they do it all the time and would probably be your best source for information on what type of counsellor you need; however, you don't [i:f8dfmqrf]have[/i:f8dfmqrf] to have a GP referral, and most counsellors will accept self-referrals from clients.[/quote:f8dfmqrf] I've just said that. Yes you can get sliding scales, but from fully qualified counsellors, it's only around €20 knocked off the full fee. Otherwise they appoint you to their trainees, and the fees are substantially lower, if even a fee at all, or at least a small donation. You can referred by a GP, but it's a recommendation. You still have to pay as they'd be private therapists. If you're seeing a private therapist, there is no need at all to go to a GP, you can ring them off your own back. To elaborate on my original point, a lot of people have spent years and years going to counsellors but to no avail. They tend to self-diagnose and think they suffer from depression, when often the problem lies much more deep rooted than depression. There are personality disorders that go undiagnosed, borderline personality disorder, histronic personality disorder, which can cause depressive like symptoms and anxiety in a person and it doesn't respond to medication, which is why it is best off getting assessed by the top, such as a psychiatrist and his/her team. Psychiatrists don't in the grand scheme of things offer therapy, they are retained more so for scitsophrenia and psychotic disorders, but they refer anything else onto their team of psychologists, who are trained and have experience in dealing with these types of problems. As I said, if you know it's a problem such as a reactive depression such as bereavement, breakup, stress-related problems, then by all means sometimes a run of the mill counseller can help just to listen. But a lot of people make big mistakes jumping from counsellor to counsellor for years and wonder why they havent been helped.