interview 22 weeks pregnant.

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rosie84d Posts: 60
Hello i have a intereivew on thrusday, i have been out off work for a year now,as i had a baby and have been looking for work for a while, just i dont know when do i say it to them that iam pregnant , i am 22 weeks,my work is hands on and busy i work as a chef so i really dont know to keep it to myself or not .I have a bump but could mangae to cover it up for a little while yet but only for anround 4 weeks. Thank you
Lizzy1 Posts: 4128
Hey Rosie i work as a chef too and find it tough going as your on your feet all day. I don't really know how to advise you but they may be pi$$ed off if you don't tell them and they find out. Another thing is lifting, i told my boss when i was 6 wks pregnant as i found the lifting hard to shy away from. Good Luck anyway hope it goes well for you :wv :wv
fluffiesmam Posts: 1470
not sure of the exact dates but you are obliged to tell your employer asap.. they have responsibilities as employers to make sure they do not put you and your baby at risk through work, so you have an simultanous obligation to let them know. if you went for the interview are you suggesting that you wouldnt tell your prospective employer at all? or is it until they offer you the job, im just playing devils advocate here, but how would you like an employer to tell you down the line that they are closing for even 3 months (depending on how long you intend of taking mat leave.), and that this was something they knew when interviewing, wouldnt you feel that this is something that you should have been made aware of at the interview process? they will have to get cover for your mat leave. its only fair they are made aware of your situation from the outset. good luck with the interview!!n :)
Winter B2B Posts: 3494
[quote="fluffiesmam":35rl22e4]not sure of the exact dates but you are obliged to tell your employer asap[/quote:35rl22e4] You are not legally obliged to tell your employer until 4 weeks period to when you intend to go on maternity leave. My advice would be not to tell them in the interview that you are pg. If you tell them and you don't get the job you'll never know if it was bacause of your ability or because you were pg.
taurus09 Posts: 484
could you wait and only tell them if they offered you the job? although I don't think they can take back the offer then so that may annoy them as much. And although you are entitled to get a job, you probably don't want to be working somewhere where they are annoyed at you iykwim
hestia Posts: 2368
[quote="fluffiesmam":16brxznc]if you went for the interview are you suggesting that you wouldnt tell your prospective employer at all? or is it until they offer you the job, im just playing devils advocate here, but how would you like an employer to tell you down the line that they are closing for even 3 months (depending on how long you intend of taking mat leave.), and that this was something they knew when interviewing, wouldnt you feel that this is something that you should have been made aware of at the interview process? they will have to get cover for your mat leave. its only fair they are made aware of your situation from the outset. [/quote:16brxznc] This is bullshit. Each company usually has a policy around this that is set out in your contract. It varies from one to another though can range from 15 weeks downwards depending on the type of work etc. You are under no obligation to reveal your circumstances until you are contractually obliged to do so. You sound like an experienced motivated individual who would make a valuable employee. You should not be guilted into making any relevations. You are protected by law. You are entitled to seek employment, take the job if offered, and proceed to have your baby. I hope things work out well for you. If you continue to have uncertainties, or encounter any discrimination, your local Citizens Information Centre will provide accurate advice and support. Christ knows us women need it.
fluffiesmam Posts: 1470
Health and safety leave An employer should carry out separate risk assessments in relation to pregnant employees and those who have recently given birth or are breastfeeding. If there are particular risks, these should be either removed or the employee moved away from them. If neither of these options is possible, the employee should be given health and safety leave from work which may continue up to the beginning of maternity leave. During health and safety leave, employers must pay employees their normal wages for the first 3 weeks, after which Health and Safety Benefit may be paid. The Health and Safety Authority website has a list of Pregnant at Work FAQs taken from: [b:1st406x0]kind of hard to do this if the employer has not been made aware of pregnancy.[/b:1st406x0] please also refer to: Legislation Applying I have just discovered I’m pregnant – from when do the regulations protect me from hazards in the workplace? The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (General Application) Regulations 2007, Part 6, Chapter 2, Protection of Pregnant, Post Natal and Breastfeeding Employees (from now on referred to as The Pregnancy Regulations) apply when an employee informs her employer that she is pregnant, has recently given birth or is breastfeeding and provides an appropriate medical certificate. As the earliest stages of pregnancy are the most critical ones for the developing child it is in the employee’s best interest to let her [b:1st406x0]employer know she is pregnant as soon as possible.[/b:1st406x0] Risk Assessment What should the employer do when he/she becomes aware that that an employee is pregnant? [b:1st406x0]Once an employer becomes aware [/b:1st406x0]that an employee is pregnant, they must assess the specific risks from the employment to that employee and take action to ensure that she is not exposed to anything, which would damage either her health or that of her developing child. What do General hazards include? Physical shocks - including direct blows to the abdomen Vibration - of whole body, there are guidelines on vibration Handling a load - there are guidelines on handling of loads Noise – there are guidelines on noise Excessive heat or cold Movement and postures which are abrupt or severe or give rise to excessive fatigue Ionising radiation Non-ionising radiation Biological agents – including viruses, bacteria etc. Chemicals – including substances, which cause cancer, mercury, anti-cancer drugs and carbon monoxide. Stress and/or bullying I am pregnant – does my employer need to provide a rest room? Regulation 24 of the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (General Application) Regulations, 2007 states “an employer shall ensure that pregnant, post natal and breastfeeding employees are able to lie down to rest in appropriate conditions Temperatures Can extremes of cold or heat affect my unborn baby or me? When pregnant, women tolerate heat less well and may be liable to heat stress and faint easily. Breast-feeding may be impaired by heat dehydration. No specific problems arise from working in extreme cold but warm clothing should be provided. Pregnant workers should take great care when exposed to prolonged heat at work, for example when working near furnaces. Rest facilities and access to water would help. What should the employer do when he/she becomes aware that that an employee is pregnant? Once an employer becomes aware that an employee is pregnant, they must assess the specific risks from the employment to that employee and take action to ensure that she is not exposed to anything, which would damage either her health or that of her developing child. please also refer to: and: Maternity Leave is a statutory right and there is a wealth of legislation relating to it. The Maternity Protection Act, 1994 which is referred to as the “Principal Act” and the Amendment Act of 2004 are the main legislative Acts pertaining to Maternity Leave law in Ireland. It is under these Acts that entitlements and notice periods are set out. In addition, the Unfair Dismissals legislation should also be considered in relation to Maternity leave, as it sets out protections for an employee from dismissal, on the basis of pregnancy, giving birth, or breast feeding or for any related matters. Dismissal on any of the above grounds will be found to be automatically unfair. The Act also protects an employee from dismissal, if they exercise or if they propose to exercise a right under the Maternity protection Acts, for any form of protective leave or natal care absence. The following key entitlements are available to staff under this Act: The minimum period of maternity leave which an employee is entitled to is 26 weeks leave and this leave commences not later than 2 weeks before the end of the expected week of confinement. An employee may take an additional 16 weeks unpaid maternity leave if they wish. Employees are also entitled to paid time off from work to attend one set of ante natal classes; the employee must give notice in writing to their employer of the dates and times of the classes at least 2 weeks before the first class/es. Employees are entitled to paid time off for ante–natal/post–natal care, and this is as much as is necessary. Health & Safety leave is another entitlement that employees may be entitled to where in certain circumstances the employment conditions can prove to be a hazard to the employee. If an employee has a still birth or miscarriage any time after the 24th week of pregnancy – the employee is entitled to full maternity leave. [b:1st406x0]The above entitlements are only available to those who inform their employer of their condition and therefore evoke the protection of the Act.[/b:1st406x0] so perhaps before my opinion has been branded "bullshit", perhaps you could look at the implications of not making the new employer aware.. hope you got on well at the interview.
hestia Posts: 2368
While informative, none of that is relevant until she is an 'employee'. At present, she is a candidate. She isn't required to enter into the exchange of obligations set out above until she signs her contract. Therein lies the difference between accurate employment law, and individual speculation.
Winter B2B Posts: 3494
I know this is off topic.......but I'd love to know how many employers actually do a risk assessment?!?!?!?
fluffiesmam Posts: 1470
my reply referred to the 4 weeks notice that you only need give an employer. my reply was about the implications of not telling your EMPLOYER, my personal opinion, is that a kitchen is a relatively dangerous place to work and would imagine is even more so for a pregnant woman as the risks are high, moreso than a mere office job, so the employer should be made aware that a full risk assessment needs to be carried out and that the kitchen needs to be pregnancy safe when starting the job. as regards, contractual obligations, im assuming your stance would remain the same with regard to the employer who can omit issues that may effect the post in the short term because after all, there is no contractual obliagation on them to tell you. such as in this case, where in 16 weeks (12 wks + 4 notice) (im assuming the op will only take the 2 min you have to take to meet mat benefit entitlement ) they will have no chef. i believe that if the employer is not made aware at the interview they should def be made aware if the job is offered. its the fairest scenario for all involved, because as was said earlier by taurus09, if the offer is taken off the table, then it would very obviously appear to be discrimination which would deter the employer from recinding the offer.