Racism? Question - Page 3

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OrangeDaisies Posts: 77
[quote="bazinga":3kpz91b6][quote="katief":3kpz91b6] Hattie McDaniel was the first black person to win an Oscar. She played that squeaky chick in Gone with the Wind.[/quote:3kpz91b6] How dare you. She played Mammy. Mammy rocked.[/quote:3kpz91b6] Interesting reading on the Mammy here: [url:3kpz91b6]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammy_archetype[/url:3kpz91b6]. And of course, the whole "Magical Negro" problem, which still persists in film and television. Interesting thread. I would say "black", as the whole "African-American" thing is pretty specific to the States (and even then, problematic, as it leaves out Caribbean heritages). Still, I agree with whoever posted up-thread about the wider issue here, which is that we have a very binary definition of colour ("white" and "non-white") which assumes "white" as the default. It's a non-colour. We would rarely describe someone as "white" - colour is specified as only a marker of difference. I get that up until recently we weren't a very multi-ethnic society, but I think that the point stands across Western culture generally.
ladymacbeth Posts: 713
[quote="ReginaFalange":isluidr7] In America however, the term coloured is seen as outdated and offensive.[/quote:isluidr7] It is outdated but I don't know that its necessarily offensive , the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is one of the biggest civil rights groups in the states. In the Southern states it probably is though . 'Person of colour' or 'people of colour' just jars though in real conversation , can you picture it ....... tell me about your new boyfriend, what does he look like for when I pick him up from the airport......... he lands in shannon at five , he's really tall , super hot , he's a person of colour and he'll be wearing a blue jumper ....... great , I can;t wait to meet him .......... know what I mean ?!! I really think that football commentator who got shot down for using the word was really unnecessarily picked on , he clearly was trying to say the right thing as there are more ethnic groups in the group he was discussing than black or white . There are also circumstances where you would get shot for saying ethnic minority as its seen by some as a really negative term . Sometimes, depending on where you are, you're wrong no matter what you say !
katief Posts: 1900
[quote="bazinga":3hgzn5b6][quote="katief":3hgzn5b6][quote="ladymacbeth":3hgzn5b6]Halle berry Oscar speech ' this is for every faceless woman of colour ' . [b:3hgzn5b6]First woman who wasn't white to win an Oscar [/b:3hgzn5b6], one parent back, one parent white . I think she was being inclusive of more than just African American women by saying coloured rather than AA or even black . It's not necessarily a negative term depending on the context[/quote:3hgzn5b6] Sorry, as an aside. Not true. Hattie McDaniel was the first black person to win an Oscar. She played that squeaky chick in Gone with the Wind.[/quote:3hgzn5b6] How dare you. She played Mammy. Mammy rocked.[/quote:3hgzn5b6] Ah she was a tad squeaky though. Classic film though eh?
izzie123 Posts: 235
I was watching Oprah yesterday and she referred to herself as a "coloured girl"
Flower Girl Posts: 1645
[quote="katief":19irokj9][quote="bazinga":19irokj9][quote="katief":19irokj9] Hattie McDaniel was the first black person to win an Oscar. She played that squeaky chick in Gone with the Wind.[/quote:19irokj9] How dare you. She played Mammy. Mammy rocked.[/quote:19irokj9] Ah she was a tad squeaky though. Classic film though eh?[/quote:19irokj9] It was the other, younger black housemaid who was squeaky (and very annoying). Mammy was a legend. I'd always say black, unless specifically talking about South African 'coloureds', who consider themselves ethnically distinct from the black population. But a lot of people of my parents' generation would still say 'coloured', as this was seen to be more polite when they were growing up. While 'coloured' may be inaccurate, I don't think it's inherently offensive.
Time For A Change Posts: 6885
Hubby and I are very involved in our local community, and we deal with a number of different nationalities. We were chatting to one of the Community Gardai one day and something came up about which do you say, black or coloured. The Garda said that there was an incident where some black woman was throwing the race card at this Garda. The woman started shouting that the Garda was being racist by calling her black. The Garda turned around and said "Why can't I call you black, you are black the same as you would call me white, so should I call you racist for calling me white?!" The woman shut up.
NittyGritty Posts: 1605
[quote="Time For A Change":2tq4tnc9]The woman started shouting that the Garda was being racist by calling her black.[/quote:2tq4tnc9] Out of interest, if she was standing right beside him, why was the Garda calling her black? Like, was it, "what's your name and how do you spell it, black lady?" I can't think of any reason why he would have had to refer to the colour of her skin when she was standing right there. The only time I can imagine this description being used by the police is when they're calling out an APB over their walkie talkies to describe someone they want to capture. Like on the telly.
Bazinga T McBinkers Posts: 4718
[quote="NittyGritty":2fjevsbe][quote="Time For A Change":2fjevsbe]The woman started shouting that the Garda was being racist by calling her black.[/quote:2fjevsbe] Out of interest, if she was standing right beside him, why was the Garda calling her black? Like, was it, "what's your name and how do you spell it, black lady?" I can't think of any reason why he would have had to refer to the colour of her skin when she was standing right there. The only time I can imagine this description being used by the police is when they're calling out an APB over their walkie talkies to describe someone they want to capture. Like on the telly.[/quote:2fjevsbe] Have to say I thought that though on first read, why mention her skin colour at all to her?
Time For A Change Posts: 6885
[quote="NittyGritty":1si8klxv][quote="Time For A Change":1si8klxv]The woman started shouting that the Garda was being racist by calling her black.[/quote:1si8klxv] Out of interest, if she was standing right beside him, why was the Garda calling her black? Like, was it, "what's your name and how do you spell it, black lady?" I can't think of any reason why he would have had to refer to the colour of her skin when she was standing right there. The only time I can imagine this description being used by the police is when they're calling out an APB over their walkie talkies to describe someone they want to capture. Like on the telly.[/quote:1si8klxv] Sorry, I hit Submit too quickly. :-8 I meant to say that the black woman was giving out, that the only reason the Garda had stopped her (for whatever reason, I don't know why), was only because she was black.
NittyGritty Posts: 1605
I reckon you've only half the story there, TFAC. In that case, the woman herself has referred to herself as black first, as in, "You're only stopping me because I'm black", so there was no reason for her to get p!ssed when the garda used the same term. Unless she said that he was only stopping her because of the colour of her skin and the garda used the word black when replying. Without knowing the full story, it's hard to know if the 'race card' was a fair comment for your friend to make on this one. Let's face it though, it wouldn't be the first time the law have picked someone out simply because they're black. As far as I'm concerned, Ireland is extremely racist, no ifs, ands or buts about it. And that very much includes some of its Gardai, which I know from personally hearing it come out of their mouths. Anyway, I always thought 'black' was the correct term. Never heard of the SA preference for 'coloured'. Must edumacate myself tonight on that one.