solids before 6 months? - Page 2

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Daisy Row Posts: 3650
started lo on baby rice about 18 weeks.
star13 Posts: 291
The uk recommend 6 months for breast & formula fed, not sure why it's different in Ireland.
ructions Posts: 2689
z
noc Posts: 1802
Well, not exactly ructions. You and your DH are adults with fully developed digestive systems. Of course there is variation between appetite between people including babies as in, some babies will want more [i:341oz0bp]milk[/i:341oz0bp] than others but it doesn't follow that their bodies are more developed and more capable of digesting solid foods. The guidelines are there because research has shown that babies are better equipped physically to deal with eating and digesting solid food from six months. They can just about cope with a tiny amount of pureed solids at four months but ideally, it is better if they can just have milk until they are six months old. A lot of the so-called signs that babies are 'ready' are not proven. The accepted signs of physical readiness are being able to sit up by themselves (i.e. their head isn't flopping around and body isn't slumped so they can swallow food better and their muscles are visibly stronger and more developed which indicates that the muscles of their digestive tract are similarly stronger), they can swallow food and have lost the tongue-thrust reflex (i.e. they don't push food straight back out of their mouth with their tongue), and they have good hand-eye co-ordination and can take objects to their mouth without difficulty. Not sleeping well, watching you eat with interest etc. can have other explanations and causes. Even seeming hungry and dissatisfied with milk feeds might just mean they need more milk. Medical guidelines have some flexibility built into them (i.e. they say definitely no earlier than 4 months but six-months or as close to it is preferable) but they are based on scientific research so shouldn't be dismissed lightly.
jdurso Posts: 351
[quote="noc":21m6vr4z]Well, not exactly ructions. You and your DH are adults with fully developed digestive systems. Of course there is variation between appetite between people including babies as in, some babies will want more [i:21m6vr4z]milk[/i:21m6vr4z] than others but it doesn't follow that their bodies are more developed and more capable of digesting solid foods. The guidelines are there because research has shown that babies are better equipped physically to deal with eating and digesting solid food from six months. They can just about cope with a tiny amount of pureed solids at four months but ideally, it is better if they can just have milk until they are six months old. A lot of the so-called signs that babies are 'ready' are not proven. The accepted signs of physical readiness are being able to sit up by themselves (i.e. their head isn't flopping around and body isn't slumped so they can swallow food better and their muscles are visibly stronger and more developed which indicates that the muscles of their digestive tract are similarly stronger), they can swallow food and have lost the tongue-thrust reflex (i.e. they don't push food straight back out of their mouth with their tongue), and they have good hand-eye co-ordination and can take objects to their mouth without difficulty. Not sleeping well, watching you eat with interest etc. can have other explanations and causes. Even seeming hungry and dissatisfied with milk feeds might just mean they need more milk. Medical guidelines have some flexibility built into them (i.e. they say definitely no earlier than 4 months but six-months or as close to it is preferable) but they are based on scientific research so shouldn't be dismissed lightly.[/quote:21m6vr4z] Great post noc - also, your intestines have what are known as villi attached to them, they protect your intestines. If something like gluten is introduced too early then the villi aren't strong enough, are destroyed by the gluten which in turn passes through the intestines causing digestive problems. If this does happen then you can cut gluten out, this gives the villi a chance to repair themselves and become strong enough to withstand the gluten once it is slowly introduced.again. This is why you may hear of people "growing out of food intolerances". I started at 6 months and went straight to Baby-led - it's brilliant, so easy - DS wouldn't tolerate being spoonfed anyway so has worked out great and he hasn't choked once!
wowza Posts: 556
I weaned DD at about 20 weeks. It went great. She loves her grub. There are some foods that I didn't give her until she was a bit older - like I kept her off gluten and meat until she was 6 months. I was also cautious about giving her known allergens - I gave them to her, but no more than one a day, so if she did have a reaction I'd know what from. So I introduced kiwi, tomatoes, citrus fruits, strawberries, peanut butter and the like slowly. I know there is a lot of research put into these things, but if you follow every single guideline you will drive yourself demented! Unfortunately there are parents out there who wean their children straight onto happy meals and coke, and from a young age, so obviously this sort of thing isn't going to help the obesity problems. There was other research too that I read that says introducing gluten too late can lead to an intolerance too, so what I gathered was after 6 months but before 7 months! I really don't think that a diet of veg for a month or two is going to cause any problem in her life or lead to obesity. (I introduced veg first and then fruit in an attempt to encourage her to prefer savoury food! Dunno if it's worked because she eats almost everything anyway, but it didn't do any harm!) You're the mammy and if you think your LO is ready then you are probably right.
mamajen Posts: 2263
[quote="wowza":373r5939] You're the mammy and if you think your LO is ready then you are probably right.[/quote:373r5939] +1
MiniBlingfor2012 Posts: 673
Also to add that it is the hse booklet I was given by the phn that states between 4-6 months for bottle fed babies but not before 17 weeks, 6 months for breasted babies. It was also here I was advised on how to tell when dd was ready to start. As above u know ur baby and when they are ready obv within the guidelines where possible to be sensible. Hth and njoy, it's a lovely new milestone to reach!
wowza Posts: 556
I don't understand why it's different for bottle fed and breast fed babies? Does anyone know?
MiniBlingfor2012 Posts: 673
I could be wrong but I think it's that breasted babies get enough from just breast milk until months, they don't need anything extra. Anyone else any insight on this?