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Would you hire a male child minder?

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Anahita Posts: 1161
Just curious as to what the replies here would be. I'm not in a position to have to think about this yet by the way! :o0 When I was 20 my Mam looked after 3 kids as a 2nd job but gave it up as two jobs was too much so I took over until someone else was found. The children's mother advertised the job in the paper and she told me if a male called to apply for it to say it was gone. So it got me thinking would anyone employ a male childminder? I think as long as he has qualifications and/or experience I would. Same things I'd look for in a female applicant.
Urban Fairy Posts: 3987
I think its the 'maternal' and more gentle qualities that the average woman would have would be her strength although I'm sure theres plenty of men who could prove themselves just as worthy of those attributes given half the chance. To answer your question though, I really dont know. I'm inclined to say no I wouldnt for my above reason but I dont think its a pc answer.
ScarlettoHara Posts: 8442
No I probably wouldnt. Why?? Not sure but I just wouldnt!!
Urban Fairy Posts: 3987
This thread makes me think of Freddy Prince Junior when he was Emma's manny in [i:28jvcuy9]Friends[/i:28jvcuy9]
GreenerPastures Posts: 7284
I couldn't say I definitely wouldn't. I can't pretend I wouldn't be surprised to see a man working in a creche or advertising as a childminder but if he has references and the experience why not. My sister went out with a lovely guy years ago. He ended up working as a carer. He would have liked to work with children but he said years later when he met her again that the attitude of people put him off working with children. Their was an assumption he was a weirdo. It's an unhealthy attitude to give children. Women can be pretty much anything they set their mind to but men are still gender stereotyped.
Urban Fairy Posts: 3987
[quote="MrsDodders":2zcsh17t] Women can be pretty much anything they set their mind to but men are still gender stereotyped.[/quote:2zcsh17t] You're right. I think women would kick up a bigger fuss if they we're told they shouldnt do a certain job because of their gender. Its so unfortunate that that guy didnt work as a child carer because of the attitudes of others - although I'd be a culprit like many of thinking 'oh, a man? Thats interesting', but I wouldnt brand him a weirdo. My pal is a carer for children with special needs, but he's a trained physcologist, so his 'caring' doesnt really entail tending to the day to day needs of the child, more so just helping asperges and autistic children cope/understand everyday stuff.
GreenerPastures Posts: 7284
Women are more maternal BUT we are talking about men who are presumably qualified to work with children. Their qualifications should speak louder than their gender. If they want to work with children that should speak to us of their character and that they are more caring and nurturing than the average man.
SGirl Posts: 2542
I'll be brutelly honest- I would only hire a male childminder if LO didn't have his Daddy around, otherwise I would prefer a woman- sexist YES!
Urban Fairy Posts: 3987
[quote="MrsDodders":19t7og73]Women are more maternal BUT we are talking about men who are presumably qualified to work with children. Their qualifications should speak louder than their gender. If they want to work with children that should speak to us of their character and that they are more caring and nurturing than the average man.[/quote:19t7og73] This is a good point
gottabfp Posts: 5641
I am a manager of a creche and 3 years ago we hired a guy, came highly recommended etc. The amount of parents that called me aside about him . I asked eachone of them why they had a problem with it, No one could pin point it but just said it was unusal. Turns out the guy was crap at his job but it wouldnt turn me off hiring another guy if they applied. i think its the whole thing about it being different to what is normal.